Spanish missions in Texas
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Spanish missions in Texas

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Published by Vance Bibliographies in Monticello, Ill .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Texas

Subjects:

  • Franciscans -- Missions -- Texas -- History -- Bibliography.,
  • Spanish mission buildings -- Texas -- Bibliography.,
  • Spaniards -- Texas -- History -- Bibliography.,
  • Texas -- History -- To 1846 -- Bibliography.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementCharlotte Wren Pevoto.
SeriesArchitecture series--bibliography,, A 1483
Classifications
LC ClassificationsZ1339 .P49 1985, F387 .P49 1985
The Physical Object
Pagination9 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2759105M
ISBN 100890286132
LC Control Number86113861

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Spanish Missions in Texas. Courtesy of the Texas Almanac. Image available on the Internet and included in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section The Spanish mission was a frontier institution that sought to incorporate indigenous people into the Spanish colonial empire, its Catholic religion, and certain aspects of its Hispanic culture. The Spanish Missions in Texas. Between and , Spanish friars travelled north from Mexico into the area that is now the state of Texas, where they built dozens of missions and presidios (military forts). The goal of the Franciscan friars was to spread the Catholic faith by converting the native Indians. Additional Physical Format: Online version: McCaleb, Walter Flavius, Spanish missions of Texas. San Antonio: Naylor Co., [] (OCoLC) Get this from a library! Spanish missions of Texas. [Byron Browne] -- "After the conquest of Mexico by Hernan Cortés in the sixteenth century, conquistadors and explorers poured into the territory of Nueva España. The Franciscans followed in their wake but carved a.

Spanish Missions of Texas (Landmarks) Paperback – Janu by Byron Browne (Author) › Visit Amazon's Byron Browne Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central 5/5(2).   Chapter 2 The Missions and Presidios of Goliad Chapter 3 The Missions and Presidios of El Paso Chapter 4 The Missions and Presidios of San Antonio Chapter 5 The Missions and Presidios of San Xavier, San Sabá, and El Cañon Conclusion Notes Index About the Author Brand: History Press, The. Many of the Texas missions were relocated, sometimes more than once, and often the mission names were changed. Some were simply abandoned or destroyed. In the table below we show the final name and approximate final location. Locations are approximate and refer to the nearest modern city or town. An asterisk (*) on the name or location. Missions Spread and Fail In the Spanish built their first mission, Ysleta, in what is now Texas near El Paso. Eight years later, the Spanish built a mission in eastern Texas. By , there were more than twenty Spanish missions in Texas. The last Texas mission was established in File Size: KB.

  The Spanish chapter of Georgia's earliest colonial history is dominated by the lengthy mission era, extending from through Catholic missions were the primary means by which Georgia's indigenous Native American chiefdoms were assimilated into the Spanish colonial system along the northern frontier of greater Spanish Florida. Arranging for adequate protection of the San Xavier missions provided the college with a new challenge. The viceroy had approved the transfer of thirty soldiers from the presidios at Los Adaes, San Antonio, and La Bahía in , but local officials in Texas refused to comply with his instructions. Byron Browne, Spanish Missions of Texas Byron Browne is a writer and teacher living in Austin, Texas, with his wife, Angie. He has written on subjects as various as the bullfights in Spain to the viticulture industry in West Texas. By the late s the Spanish crown had begun to view the missions as a drain on Spanish finances. The missions had not grown enough to give money back to Spain. Also, maintaining presidios to protect the missions became too expensive. Still, by the end of the s, Spaniards had managed to build 26 missions in Texas. PresidiosFile Size: 1MB.